Recess May Reduce Nearsightedness

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Although myopia (or nearsightedness) is normally inherited, cases have increased by more than 65 percent in the U.S. since 1970, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Although myopia in children is correctable, it can become more severe in adulthood, increasing the risk of diseases such as glaucoma and retinal detachment. Fortunately, several studies suggestRead more…

How to Prevent Eye Strain This School Year

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A fourth of children in school require glasses or contact lenses to correct vision problems that often go undetected, reports the American Optometric Association (AOA). Since many eye health problems are left untreated, issues like eye strain can become increasingly worse overtime.  Cause of Eye Strain in Children Children often find it difficult to adapt to increasingRead more…

Prepare Your Child for National Eye Exam Month in August

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In the U.S. alone, around 12.2 million people lack the vision correction they need. According to the Vision Council of America, this is due in part to the fact that almost half of parents with children under the age of 12 have never taken their kids to see an eye care professional. As a result, August hasRead more…

Back-to-School Vision Health Checklist

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Preparing children for school goes beyond purchasing new supplies and updating their wardrobes — parents should also make sure that their kids’ eyes are healthy. Oftentimes, children are mislabeled as having a learning or behavioral disability when in actuality, they’re suffering from a vision or eye health problem. It’s essential to make sure your kids can see well soRead more…

Understanding Heterochromia in Children

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Although uncommon, it’s possible for a person to have two different colored eyes. This condition is known as heterochromia, which may appear in two forms. In heterochromia iridis, various colors appear within the iris of a single eye, whereas in heterochromia iridum, a person has eyes that are different colors from one another, explains Scientific American.Read more…